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Two State Courts Reject Arbitration Because Clause Lacked Administrator

This post is aimed at drafters of arbitration clauses. Because if you don’t insert an administrator for your arbitration, and don’t anticipate that the administrator may just stop providing services, your arbitration clause is dead in the water. At least, that’s the holding of two new state court cases.

In A-1 Premium Acceptance, Inc. v. Hunter, 2018 WL 4998256 (Mo. Oct. 16, 2018), the Supreme Court of Missouri affirmed the lower court’s decision to deny a defendant’s motion to compel arbitration. The reason was that the arbitration agreement within the 2006 loan documents provided “any claim or dispute related to this agreement…shall be resolved by binding arbitration by the National Arbitration Forum [NAF], under the Code of Procedure then in effect.” As regular readers are aware, the NAF stopped administering consumer arbitration in 2009. Although many courts have enforced arbitration agreements, despite their inclusion of NAF, Missouri did not. It found that the language of this clause showed that the parties intended to arbitrate before the NAF and only the NAF. Therefore, the court refused to use Section 5 of the FAA to appoint a replacement administrator.

In Flanzman v. Jenny Craig, Inc., Docket No. A-2580-17T1 (N.J. Super. Ct. App. Div. Oct. 17, 2018), New Jersey’s appellate division was faced with a slightly different problem: the parties’ arbitration clause did not provide what rules would govern the arbitration nor which entity would administer it.  As a result, the court found the arbitration clause was never formed, because the employee could not give informed assent. It reasoned:

Selecting an arbitral institution informs the parties, at a minimum, about that institution’s arbitration rules and procedures.  Without knowing this basic information, parties to an arbitration agreement will be unfamiliar with the rights that replaced judicial adjudication.  That is, the parties will not reach a “meeting of the minds.”

While clarifying that no magic words were required, the New Jersey court noted that if the parties don’t identify an “arbitral institution (such as AAA or JAMS)” they should at least identify the process for selecting a forum.  Otherwise, arbitration agreements will not be enforced under New Jersey law. (Unlike Missouri, the New Jersey court did not discuss Section 5 of the FAA and the statutory authority for courts to appoint arbitrators.)

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